An analysis of the origin and nature of cosmogony

A Jewish mystical tradition with roots in Palestine during the 1st century CE and which developed during the 12th century.

An analysis of the origin and nature of cosmogony

Make of Him no idols and visible images; but rather worship Him in the deep solitudes of sequestered forests; for He is invisible, and fills the Universe as its soul, and liveth not in any Temple! God is the principle of everything that exists, and the Father of all Beings.

An analysis of the origin and nature of cosmogony

He is eternal, immovable, and Self-Existent. There are no bounds to His power. At one glance He sees the Past, the Present, and the Future; and the procession of the builders of the Pyramids, with us and our remotest Descendants, is now passing before Him. He reads our thoughts before they are known to ourselves.

He rules the movements of the Universe, and all events and revolutions are the creatures of His will. They builded me temples and towers, and burned sacrifices to me upon a thousand altars. Light was divine to them, and they thought me a God.

He has lost the truth and found error. An analysis of the origin and nature of cosmogony has wandered far into darkness; and round him Sin and Shame hover evermore.

The Soul that is impure, and sinful, and defiled with earthly stains, cannot again unite with God, until, by long trials and many purifications, it is finally delivered from the old calamity; and Light overcomes Darkness and dethrones it, in the Soul.

In Him were all things originally contained, and from Him all things were evolved. Man, with senses, instinct, and a reasoning mind! Then man asked himself, "What am I? While yet the first oaks still put forth their leaves, man lost the perfect knowledge of the One True God, the Ancient Absolute Existence, the Infinite Mind and Supreme Intelligence; and floated helplessly out upon the shoreless ocean of conjecture.

Then the soul vexed itself with seeking to learn whether the material Universe was a mere chance combination of atoms, or the work of Infinite, Uncreated Wisdom: With their finite limited vision they sought to learn the source and explain the existence of Evil, and Pain, and Sorrow; and so they wandered ever deeper into the darkness, and were lost; and there was for them no longer any God; but only a great, dumb, soulless Universe, full of mere emblems and symbols.

You have heretofore, in some of the Degrees through which you have passed, heard much of the ancient worship of the Sun, the Moon, and the other bright luminaries of Heaven, and of the Elements and Powers of Universal Nature. You have been made, to p.

Perhaps you have supposed that we, like many who have written on these subjects, have intended to represent this worship to you as the most ancient and original worship of the first men that lived.

To undeceive you, if such was your conclusion, we have caused the Personifications of the Great Luminary of Heaven, under the names by which he was known to the most ancient nations, to proclaim the old primitive truths that were known to the Fathers of our race, before men came to worship the visible manifestations of the Supreme Power and Magnificence and the Supposed Attributes of the Universal Deity in the Elements and in the glittering armies that Night regularly marshals and arrays upon the blue field of the firmament.

An analysis of the origin and nature of cosmogony

We ask now your attention to a still further development of these truths, after we shall have added something to what we have already said in regard to the Chief Luminary of Heaven, in explanation of the names and characteristics of the several imaginary Deities that represented him among the ancient races of men.

He was the same with Kneph, from whose mouth issued the Orphic egg out of which came the Universe. In the popular legend, Dionusos, as well as Hercules, was a Theban Hero, born of a mortal mother.

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Both were sons of Zeus, both persecuted by Here. But in Hercules the God is subordinate to the Hero; while Dionusos, even in poetry, retains his divine character, and is identical with Iacchus, the presiding genius of the Mysteries.

Personification of the Sun in Taurus, as his ox-hoofs showed, the delivered earth from the harsh dominion of Winter, conducted the mighty chorus of the Stars, and the celestial revolution of the year, changed with the seasons, and underwent their periodical decay.

The Mysteries taught the doctrine of Divine Unity; and that Power Whose Oneness is a seeming mystery, but really a truism, was Dionusos, the God of Nature, or of that moisture, which is the life of Nature, who prepares in darkness, in Hades or Iasion, the return of life and vegetation, or is himself the light and change evolving their varieties.

In the Egean Islands he was Butes, Dardanus, Himeros or Imbros; in Crete he appears as Iasius or even Zeus, whose orgiastic worship, remaining unveiled by the usual forms of mystery, betrayed to profane curiosity the symbols which, if irreverently contemplated, were sure to be misunderstood. Through the envious artifices of Here, the Titans eluded the vigilance of his guardians and tore him to pieces; but Pallas restored the still palpitating heart to his father, who commanded Apollo to bury the dismembered remains upon Parnassus.

Dionusos, as well as Apollo, was leader of the Muses; the tomb of one accompanied the worship of the other; they were the same, yet different, contrasted, yet only as filling separate parts in the same drama; and the mystic and heroic personifications, the God of Nature and of Art, seem, at some remote period, to have proceeded from a common source.

Their separation was one of form p.

The dispersed Pythagoreans, "Sons of Apollo," immediately betook themselves to the Orphic Service of Dionusos, and there are indications that there was always something Dionysiac in the worship of Apollo.

Dionusos is the Sun, that liberator of the elements; and his spiritual meditation was suggested by the same imagery which made the Zodiac the supposed path of the Spirits in their descent and their return. His second birth, as offspring of the highest, is a type of the spiritual regeneration of man.

He, as well as Apollo, was preceptor of the Muses and source of inspiration. His rule prescribed no unnatural mortification: He is the "Liberator. All soul is part of the Universal Soul, whose totality is Dionusos; and he leads back the vagrant spirit to its home, and accompanies it through the purifying processes, both real and symbolical, of its earthly transit.

He died and descended to the Shades; and his suffering was the great secret of the Mysteries, as death is the grand mystery of existence. He is the immortal suitor of Psyche the Soulthe Divine influence which physically called the world into being, and which, awakening the soul from its Stygian trance, restores it from earth to Heaven.The chronology of the universe describes the history and future of the universe according to Big Bang cosmology.

The earliest stages of the universe's existence are estimated as taking place billion years ago, with an uncertainty of around 21 million years at the 68% confidence level.

Judaism - The Judaic tradition: A paradigmatic statement is made in the narrative that begins with Genesis and ends with Joshua. In the early chapters of Genesis, the divine is described as the creator of humankind and the entire natural order. In the stories of Eden, the Flood, and the Tower of Babel, humans are recognized as rebellious and disobedient.

Origin of Jewish Mysticism. The Shining Ones. According to adherents of Kabbalah, the origin of Kabbalah begins with the Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible). Cabala (also spelled Cabalah, Caballa, Caballah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Cabballa, Cabballah, and various spellings starting with the letters K or Q): A Jewish mystical tradition with roots in Palestine during the 1st century CE and which developed during the 12th century.

It uses occultic (hidden) knowledge to interpret the Torah. It is currently enjoying a surge in popularity. Preface. Now that my Systematic Theology is again being reprinted, the Preface can be very brief. It is not necessary to say much about the nature of the work, since it has been before the public for more than fifteen years and has been used extensively.

The first line of figures gives the regular series, from 1 to The second reproduces this line doubly; first ascending, from the first figure of 18, and then returning from the second figure of

Glossary of religious terms beginning with the letter C